How We Talk About Teenage Girls (And Their Bodies)

Here’s a trio of pieces (one of them from the Onion) consider how we talk about teenage girls and why talking about teenage girls in these ways is damaging:

The Myth of the Teenage Temptress: Or Why A Young Girl Cannot Consent To Sex With An Adult Man (warning: there is some frank discussion of sex in this piece)

The Six Ways We Talk About Teenage Girls Age

Teenage Girl Blossoming Into Beautiful Object

 

Edit:

This is slightly related. Here’s an article analyzing the defenses that Hollywood notables brought for Roman Polanski in 2009. Polanski was accused of drugging and raping a 13-year-old girl in the 1970s. One of the reasons so many people gave for defending him is the fact that Polanski and the girl had sex before, as if that precluded the possibility of rape and as if a 13-year-old could give consent to an adult man.

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2 thoughts on “How We Talk About Teenage Girls (And Their Bodies)

  1. I just read the article on “blossoming into a beautiful object” and as funny as it was, as the Onion is a humorous site, it contains so much truth. And all the postings of “selfies” and dressing sexuallly, and being so apperance focused doesn’t help. And I’m all about being able to express ourselves as sexual and expressive beings, but I hate that when we do, we are just playing right into what society wants. Because when that happens, it gets warped and we are turned into nothing more than possessions for men’s amusement and pleasure. Ugh. Its a mess.

  2. The first article The Myth of The Teenage Temptress was really shocking and interesting. I found it shocking that Stacey Rambold only spent a total of 30 days in jain. Like, really?! ONLY 30 days? That’s frightening. Another shocking thing was the fact that he had the audacity to say that she was “as much in control of the situation.” She was only 14 years old.. he should have known better and told her no. I was pretty disgusted after reading about that.

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